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How to sing high notes like christina perri?

How to sing high notes like christina perri? Topic: Damage case song
May 24, 2019 / By Héloïse
Question: I want to be able to sing like Christina perri, like her high notes and her beautiful voice and stuff. Any tips on being able to sing higher? I can't sing that high so any help is appreciated, thanks(:
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Best Answers: How to sing high notes like christina perri?

Dympna Dympna | 1 day ago
Christina Perri doesn't sing that high. Her voice is very much in a low contralto range, but even so, HER high notes are sung in a head voice. You may not know how to get into this register, so you strain when you try to go to the higher parts. Or you just have a very low voice. I've sung a few of her songs and had them transposed UP. Which means you can always transpose the songs DOWN. The problem you might run into would be that the songs could now become too low for you to sing. In that case, it's not a matter of whether you can sing high notes or not, but if you have enough overall range (as in number of notes you can comfortably sing). No you can't suddenly develop more range by singing scales. In fact, trying to force yourself to sing higher and higher, with no knowledge of how high you can actually SAFELY go, might cause damage to your current voice. If you want to make YOUR voice sound more beautiful, you'll just have to take singing lessons from a real teacher. However, Christina Perri is Christina Perri. Trying too hard to sound exactly like another singer whose voice may be completely different than yours will only make you frustrated and feeling like you have no talent when you might be an incredible singer, but not one that sounds like Perri. By the way, I don't try to sound like Perri when I sing her songs. I do try to stay in the appropriate style (I usually sing classical music--so I'm not using THAT voice). Of course, there's always someone who will come up to me afterwards and point out that I don't sound like the recording. LOL Keep singing FUN! Stress is bad for the voice!
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Dympna Originally Answered: Why can't I sing high notes?
Either you are about to catch a cold, are dehydrated, are not warming up your voice properly, are overdone your voice (in terms of singing time and/or vocal range) or have incorrect, unhealthy singing and/or breathing techniques in use. It takes obviously some talent, LOTS of patience, diligence, courage, hard work, dedication and LOTS of lessons with a GOOD vocal teacher. Besides, your voice will keep maturing until you are in your mid-30s so you need a lot of TIME as well. Therefore: THE ONLY SAFE way to learn the correct singing techniques & to improve properly IS to take OFFLINE face-to-face singing lessons with a fully trained vocal teacher (in case you do not have a teacher yet)! The teacher HAS TO BE in the same room with you, so that he/she could give you proper feedback. However, even the best teachers in the world cannot make wonders, so please be realistic with this. Singing lessons are NOT going to help if one is tone-deaf! Please do NOT rely on any dodgy web tutorials because that way you can misunderstand things VERY EASILY and develop bad habits, hoarseness, vocal nodules and other nasties IN NO TIME, and even though you would sound good! It is always much wiser to invest a little bit of your money/time to face-to-face lessons rather than wasting the same amount of money (or even more!) to frequent ear-nose-throat specialist visits due to aforementioned problems, so please reconsider this. If you can't afford vocal lessons, then joining a choir is the only SAFE alternative option. And believe me, but even MANY of those who have music as their hobby DO take lessons as well! Always remember to warm up your voice properly, but please know your limits and don't overdo your voice! Remember the diaphragmatic support, do not strain your throat too much! Also, remember good body posture! Avoid fizzy drinks (burp danger), dairy products (mucus risk), caffeinated products (coffee & tea included, they dry up your throat) and spicy food (irritation risk)! You can consume these things, but NEVER before singing! Do NOT shout, yell, scream nor otherwise abuse your voice AT ANY TIME! Also, please respect your vocal range; if your teacher says you are, say, more of an alto (baritone if you are male), then you ARE more of an alto (baritone). DO NOT try to imitate anyone famous, that will usually give you just bad habits and even damage your throat. You are YOU and your voice is unique, so please learn to cherish that. The world does NOT need copycats. Do NOT sing, whisper, shout, yell nor scream if having a sore throat/cold/flu, Also, do speak as little as you can if you have flu/cold/sore throat! Remember to drink at least 2 litres of room-temperature still water every day, not just during singing days! Smoking is a big no-no, as is inhaling secondhand smoke. Also, avoid staying in dusty and/or moldy environment. If there is ANY pain/discomfort present, STOP immediately and go see an ear-nose-throat specialist in order to rule out vocal nodules and other nasties.

Celandine Celandine
well to tell you the truth, I've never seen Christina Perri go that high, All i can say is practice scales! Christina's voice seems like it's in control and she knows how to hold a note so maybe practice holding notes. begin with something easy like "The Lonely" and then maybe try to sing songs like "Jar of Hearts" Hope this helped in some way :)
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Annis Annis
It's very possible to learn to sing well. You just need to know the right methods. Learn here https://biturl.im/aU2lK Singing teachers will cost money and can be expensive so they're not for everyone. Singing can be learned so it's not an "either you have it or you don't" kind of thing. Whether you sound like crap or you're decent, I recommend this singing course. It's one of the best methods to learn to sing well in a short amount of time. It's all about using efficient techniques that work.
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Yahveh Yahveh
For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/awS6Q You don't say which school you are trying to apply for, or what level (high school or college?) If it's one of those vanity type schools that really are auditioning people's bank accounts, you could go in with "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" and still get in if you can pay the tuition fees. If it's a musical theatre program that is part of a competitive performing arts high school or university, then you should consider some very important points. First of all, if the music department SPECIFICALLY ASKED that aspiring students choose MUSICAL THEATRE SONGS and you go in with a pop song (even if it was featured in one of those glittery vampire movies), then you are going to come across either as an idiot or someone who just doesn't care--or both. In some auditions, the school asks that people avoid songs from musicals that feature pop-style music such as "Hairspray", "Rent", "Spring Awakening", etc and choose material from the so-called "Golden Age of Broadway" because the songs written during that era are more challenging to sing than a lot of the music in newer shows. If by "vocal range" you mean the original song key, you realize you aren't even going to come anywhere NEAR the type of range you need to sing theatre music? "A Thousand Years" covers an octave and a half, but in the original key, you won't be going anywhere near the upper notes you would need even as an alto if you had to sing theatre music. And MOST of that song actually falls around the same 4-5 notes that stay pretty much close together (which makes it way easier to sing than another song that covers an octave and a half--"The Star-Spangled Banner"). Most of your competition will have had years of prior musical theatre experience either in school or community plays (or even some professional work in a few cases). Many would have had at least some voice training, and most certainly would have picked out audition songs WAY in advance of the date. There is NO excuse for you to say you can't sing a song from a musical because you "don't know any that well". What happens if you were cast in something you never heard of before? Would you just sing whatever songs you felt like because you didn't know that songs from the musical and DIDN'T WANT TO LEARN THEM? If your attitude toward preparing for what may be one of the most important interviews of your life is to see what you can "get away with"--don't bother to audition. You don't want to walk in and announce your song and have them ask you before you even open your mouth if you prepared "anything else"? Go to the website of the school. Read the criteria carefully. Those are "suggestions". They are requirements. Failure to follow directions to the letter can jeopardize any chances you have getting into any school worth getting into. Some schools will even post a list of suggested songs that you can safely pick from. Again, since you gave no information about what school this is, maybe all they want is for a student to pick ANY song so they can just hear what you sound like and decide what possible POTENTIAL you may have to develop. Unfortunately, even as pop songs goes--"A Thousand Years" isn't that impressive--even if it is "pretty". I think it's pretty too. In spite of my crack about glittery vampires, I actually have the sheet music (which I PAID for--not downloaded illegally somewhere) and I've sung it myself when I needed a contemporary pop song that people knew and liked (I usually do show tunes or classical). HOWEVER, since I have sung this myself, I can tell you from experience how EASY this song is to sing. If you can't manage anything more challenging--again, you will have a hard time with even modern show tunes.
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Yahveh Originally Answered: How can I learn to sing high notes not chorally?
• Learn to breathe correctly. Singing relies on proper breathing. When you sing, you expel air. You control your singing with the way you use the air you breathe in and out. To learn how to sing high notes, begin by breathing deeply, using your diaphragm instead of just your lungs. Stand or sit in an erect posture and inhale slowly and deeply, allowing your stomach to rise followed by the chest. Once you’ve mastered the technique, expel the air in short, quick breaths, saying ‘ha!’ ‘ha!’. Make sure the force comes from the diaphragm and not just the lungs. • Do warm ups. Just as you would stretch your muscles prior to exercising, so should you perform warm ups before singing or humming. Start humming a familiar song by singing in the lowest note you can muster and then slowly move higher and higher until you hit your highest note. Repeat the exercise, paying close attention to your vocal chords, along with the tone and resonance of the voice that comes out. • Start scaling. Take your middle note and then scale down, gradually singing higher notes. Scale these notes up and down repeatedly. This will exercise your voice and vocal chords and teach you how to modify your voice. Once you begin to sing in the higher octaves, try to find the best vowel modification that works well with your voice. Each voice is different, so don’t expect to sing the same song in the same way another singer belts it out. Experiment with different vowel sounds; a singer singing the word ‘you’ in a high pitch for example may have to pronounce it as ‘yo’, while another may have to sing it as ‘ya’. In some cases you might even have to mix the vowel sounds and modify it by changing the shape of your lips. • Practice. If you want to know how to sing high notes well, take good care of the best tool you have — your voice. Practice each day for a set amount of time, say 30 minutes to an hour. However, take care not to strain your vocals. If you feel sore or if your throat hurts, stop and review your technique. If pain or discomfort is present, it’s either you’re not doing the technique correctly or are pushing yourself too hard. Don’t expect to hit the high octaves overnight. Working your voice is like working your muscles. With time and practice, you will be able to develop a stronger, better tone and pitch. Next time you meet a note on a higher scale, you will be able to sing it with graceful, melodious confidence.

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