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What is the best gasoline for a turbocharged engine?

What is the best gasoline for a turbocharged engine? Topic: Mazda research
July 15, 2019 / By Edwina
Question: For cars that have stock turbos in them, what do you think is the best brand of fuel to use on them? I always put premium gas in my car, either from Shell or Sunoco. What fuel/engine and/or oil additives should you stay away from if you have a turbo engine?
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Best Answers: What is the best gasoline for a turbocharged engine?

Charley Charley | 4 days ago
I think gasoline is pretty much a commodity item these days and I don't think turbo would require anything special, possibly except higher octane if the turbo adds enough to the overall compression ratio. Your manual will clearly state to use premium if your engine is in the category that would see performance benifit from it. The exception to the assertion that gas is that that some retailers have started adhering to the new "top tier" standard which exceeds EPA requirements. From the research I have done on the internet, I think this standard has merit and these retailers (of which your current choices are included) should be preferred. In short, I would recommend shopping at one retailers listed on http://www.toptiergas.com/retailers.html and use premium only if the manual recommends it or the car 'pings' or 'knocks'. My understanding is that putting premium in an engine that doesn't require it doesn't improve performance or engine life. FYI, I experimented with different octane fuels on my previous car (91 Mazda 929S) and found that switching back from premium to regular would induce a little pinging for a few miles, even if the car normally ran well. So if you do want to try something cheaper, don't judge it until you have run the whole tank. I am certainly not an expert, but am an mechanical engineering doctoral student working on heat transfer and thermodynamics, so I would like to believe that I have some ability to sort the 'wheat from the chaff' in internet research on such things.
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Charley Originally Answered: A 2.50*10^2-kg cast-iron car engine contains water as a coolant. Suppose that the engine's temperature is.
To solve this problem you need to know the specific heats of Iron and water. The specific heat of… Iron: 0.45 Joules per gram per °C Water: 4.184 Joules per gram per °C The total energy released by the system (Iron engine and water) is equal to: Q = (m_1 * c_1 * (delta T)) + (m_2 * c_2 + (delta T)) Where m_1 and m_2 are the masses of the Iron engine and water, c_1 and c_2 are the specific heats of Iron and water, and (delta T) is the change in temperature the two substances experience. Q is the total heat energy released. We are given: Q = 4.4 E6 Joules m_1 = mass of engine = 2.5 E2 kg = 2.5 E5 grams (delta T) = (35 °C - 10 °C) = 25 °C And we are assumed to know the specific heats (listed above). We do not know, and are trying to solve for, the mass of the water = m_2. We can plug in values into the above equation for t he total energy lost by the system to get: Q = (m_1 * c_1 * (delta T)) + (m_2 * c_2 + (delta T)) (4.4 E6 Joules) = (2.5 E5 g)*(0.45 J/g°C)*(25 °C) + m_2(4.184 J/g°C)*(25 °C) (1587500 J) = energy lost by water = m_2(4.184 J/g°C)*(25 °C) Now solving for m_2, m_2 = (1587500 J) / (4.184 J/g°C)*(25 °C) m_2 = 15177 grams of water m_2 = 15.2 kg of water http://www.csun.edu/~jte35633/worksheets...
Charley Originally Answered: A 2.50*10^2-kg cast-iron car engine contains water as a coolant. Suppose that the engine's temperature is.
It's not necessarily a broken line. When a car overheats, the coolant expands, and at a critical point it comes out the overflow valve at the top of the coolant tank, and creates steam. And if there was no coolant in the tank, it was likely an overheating. However, putting more coolant in it isn't enough, because once coolant overheats and boils over, air gets trapped in the radiator and inhibits the cooling of the engine, which just leads to further overheatings. It could be just a random overheating due to low coolant, but it also could be a more serious problem such as a head gasket, cooling fan, or water pump. I'd definitely recommend taking it to the mechanic and getting it checked out. They can tell you what's wrong for sure.

Ariana Ariana
I learn a piece of writing in Car and Driver how a diesel engine rather works. Due to how the gas is ignited, diesels quite simply lend themselves to turbocharging. You appear on the gigantic majority of diesels, you're going to see a rapid plumbed into the exhaust procedure. Article beneath presents a well rationalization of a turbodiesel.
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Ariana Originally Answered: In theory would a heavy car with a big engine be more fuel efficient one with a small engine?
If both vehicles had the same gear ratio at the final drive then your theory would be correct... however they will not use the same gearing on a car that produces way less power... power to weight ratio is usually the determining factor.. thus making a vehicle that is peppy to drive and still get good mileage..
Ariana Originally Answered: In theory would a heavy car with a big engine be more fuel efficient one with a small engine?
By definition fuel efficiency is = Output/ calorific value of the fuel used. Hence the efficiency depends on air fuel ratio at all operating conditions in whatever way you achieve it. Rpm is a manifestation of the out put and not a determinant. So Out put horsepower per gram of fuel is the correct way of measure!

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