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What if I proved to you that the 'transcendent' cause of the universe was the non-conservative force:?

What if I proved to you that the 'transcendent' cause of the universe was the non-conservative force:? Topic: If then hypothesis ideas for science
July 18, 2019 / By Aglæca
Question: ...UniChronoDynamism (UCD for short)? This is a hypothetical question of course. Assume that It has all of the properties of being 'outside' of our current understanding of space and time and that its theoretical framework is falsifiable and has been tested. Theists, does UCD then = 'god'? If so, congratulations, I henceforth dub you all Pantheists (hint: you've moved the goal-posts one too many times - it is now nowhere near the playing field). Capernaum, why is everything a 'someone' with you people? Are you really that anthropocentric? Wait, don't answer that with more empty arguments, I know the answer.
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Best Answers: What if I proved to you that the 'transcendent' cause of the universe was the non-conservative force:?

Tim Tim | 4 days ago
So someone's neglected "degrees of freedom" sparked a gravitational singularity to go boom? Maybe they weren't so neglected after all huh? _______ Thx for the comments. I actually like your idea btw. My reply (unsubstantial as you may find it) ... Maybe some "one" ... maybe some " thing "... maybe some "nothing" ... created all that begins and ends ... which science shows is truth. Well actually they aren't so certain about the end ... it just might get really cold and dark. But I digress ... I do not claim "certain" knowledge - but I do claim assurance by faith. I am a Christian from the Wesleyan/Arminian tradition but am far from anthropocentric. But I am far from biocentric as well. So just "what" stirs inside you that causes you to be interested in such things? Wesleyans would call it externally prevenient. But be my guest ... go ahead and prove your hypothesis (hypothetically of course). Où es la douche?
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We found more questions related to the topic: If then hypothesis ideas for science


Tim Originally Answered: Isn't how one naturally experiences a human lifetime transcendent across all of time?
Honestly the only way I can even consider this idea is to look at five year olds.. They are old enough to be self aware and curious, and old enough to adequately articulate most of their thoughts, but are still young enough that they haven't been too influenced by being forced to conform to any strict societal mores or rules. Even if a child has been raised secluded from the rest of the world, it is generally a five year old's nature to ask questions and if asked, form independent ideas. After that, their minds, our minds, begin to be molded by nurturing, teaching, disciplines, etc. I really think a classroom of kindergarteners would give you a better answer to this than most of the higher minds of history.
Tim Originally Answered: Isn't how one naturally experiences a human lifetime transcendent across all of time?
"understand that man's evolved ability of reason and naturally increasing self awareness" Oh really, is that why most people can even reason that 10,000 proposed Gods=man creates Gods, not the other way around? A person isn't very self aware if they spend their life living in one great big delusion.

Ralphie Ralphie
I much prefer the Unified Field theory. It's actually based on observable reality. Rather than semantics. *grins* Practicing Shaman... quantum physics rocks.
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Ralphie Originally Answered: Conservative and Non-Conservative Energy: Explanation needed?
When potential energy is a function of position only. the gain of kinetic energy is the loss of potential energy when object moves from one position to another. As in the case of lifting a body against gravity or allowing it to fall through a height. This is true in the absence of frictional forces. If frictional force is present, then the energy is lost to internal energy of the body and the other body with which it come in contact and energy is lost (to internal energy) no matter which way you move up or down. Similarly when there is electromotive force then it rotates the charged particle in a circle. so there is continuous transfer of energy from the source of electromotive force and the object although the object comes back to its original position. I shall tell you a catchy phrase about energy to keep thinking about it. Standard mention in physics book is, "Energy is conserved but it runs downhill" and My catchy phrase, is Energy has two aspects: Bondage and Wastage. When it is bound it is conserved. Moment you think of transporting it it degrades, becomes part of internal energy of systems and cannot be retrieved back in full measure and quality. [Second law of thermodynamics]
Ralphie Originally Answered: Conservative and Non-Conservative Energy: Explanation needed?
Hi. I am not a physics major. I hope you get a better answer than mine. 1. General Relativity (Einstein's) says: Mass-Energy-Stress-Momentum is conserved. But this topic is for advanced students, and should be ignored until you understand classical physics. 2. The two and only two categories of energy are P.E. and K.E.; E = P.E. + K.E. (k.e. = kinetic energy, p.e. = potential energy). In Classical Physics, the (total) Energy of an isolated system is conserved. 3. The energy of a spring or an elastic substance is conserved only in the ideal case. In the real world, energy is lost (non-conserved) to heat (friction or chemical changes). I suspect this is what your lecturer is talking about. That a vibrating spring (with a weight attached) has components of energy that change second to second but that the total energy is conserved E = P.E. + K.E. = constant but P.E. = f(t) and of course K.E. = E - f(t) = g(t). Also note that there is a dependence on displacement x {or on the strain, if you are dealing with more complex cases (volumes) ← (this is usually not a 'first year' topic in school because it needs integral calculus)} So if E = 1, for a displacement x at time t=0 (the time the spring is released K.E. = 0, E = P.E. = f(x,k) =1 (where k is the spring constant) ((and the displacement is smaller than the elastic limit)). At the point of maximum speed E = ½mv² = K.E., P.E. = 0. See Wikipedia on Hooke's Law See Wikipedia on Harmonic Oscillator

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