6784 Shares

DEGREES THAT ARE MOST LIKELY TO GET YOU A JOB?

DEGREES THAT ARE MOST LIKELY TO GET YOU A JOB? Topic: Business plan for media agency
June 26, 2019 / By Gid
Question: Hello I would like some positive input on degrees that are most likely going to find you a job out of college. Being specific would help a lot Thanks! :)
Best Answer

Best Answers: DEGREES THAT ARE MOST LIKELY TO GET YOU A JOB?

Dominick Dominick | 10 days ago
Depends on where you want to work. Business and Communication degrees are probably your best bet. Business related degrees like Finance, Accounting, and Marketing are the most popular concentrated degrees among employers. You could go it buying/merchandising/planning, consulting, and so forth. For communication, public relations and journalism are the most marketable to employers, especially in media agencies. English degrees are also useful in media because literacy is always a plus. Computer science is also a top degree because it always helps to know how to handle computers.
👍 188 | 👎 10
Did you like the answer? DEGREES THAT ARE MOST LIKELY TO GET YOU A JOB? Share with your friends

We found more questions related to the topic: Business plan for media agency


Dominick Originally Answered: What are the significant differences between associates degrees, and associates in applied science degrees?
The Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science (AS) are academic degrees. They are intended/designed to prepare you for additional study at a senior college. While some don't have a 'major', some do. The important consideration is that the AA/AS is not a terminal degree intended to prepare you for a job - it's academic. The coursework is often very general and concentrated on the liberal arts. They usually equate to the first two years of a four year (bachelor's) degree. The Associate of Applied Science (AAS), Associate of Science in 'Subject' (ie; ASN) and the Associate of 'Subject' (ie: Associate of Business Administration) are applied/occupational/vocational degrees intended to prepare you for a specific occupation or vocation. A majority of the courses are vocation specific with few academic/liberal arts courses provided. The primary consideration is preparing for a specific job. Usually, if your intention is to transfer to a bachelor's program, the AA or AS (often called "transfer program") is the better option. There are some exceptions though. If you intend to become an RN and transfer to a BSN program then an ASN is the associates degree to have. Similarly, there are some engineering technology associates degrees that have bachelor's degree transfer options (engineering technology is not the same as engineering), and the same is true of many health professions technicians. If you intend to use this education as entry to a trade (such as computer repair, auto mechanics, cosmetology, horticulture, law enforcement, etc...) then the AAS is the appropriate degree. Understand though - vocational level courses do not often transfer to senior colleges bachelor's degree programs. If you could find a Bachelor of Applied Science in Automotive Mechanics then an AAS in Auto Mech might transfer well, an AAS in Auto Mech isn't going to translate very well to the typical Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science program though and you will lose hours. On the other hand, an AAS is a vocation specific degree and many people prefer not studying two years of literature, history, sociology, biology, etc... when they intend to become a plumber. An AAS in Plumbing would concentrate heavily on the technical and business aspects of being a plumbing contractor. If you intend to transfer to a bachelor's degree program (other than a specific vocational/technical bachelor's) then a general liberal arts Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree is what you'd want.
Dominick Originally Answered: What are the significant differences between associates degrees, and associates in applied science degrees?
An Associates degree is a two-year degree, and if it comes from an accredited college it can count towards a four-year degree at another college or university. Associates degrees are usually AA's (Associates of Arts), because two-year degrees usually are very basic and survey courses -- one usually doesn't have a declared major until the third and fourth years of a four-year degree.
Dominick Originally Answered: What are the significant differences between associates degrees, and associates in applied science degrees?
If you want to teach elementary education only, go for the Early Childhood Education. If you are indecisive about what grade for teaching, go for Teaching degree, because it will make you more marketable and because of the bad economy, an easier chance for a job. Can you teach without a Bachelors? ...I'm not so sure. I think you need a degree, which you can get after your Bachelors, well, at least in my state. Best of luck, sweetie! (:

Bradley Bradley
A hard question to answer. In a lot of cases it's not about what degree will best get you a job, it's really about the grade you achieve. If you have a first or a 2:1 in any subject then most employers will take that into account. Then you get vocational degrees, such as nursing, law, engineering etc etc which are very good for if you want a job in them fields
👍 70 | 👎 8

Bradley Originally Answered: What do all the different law degrees mean: llm, msl, jd, jsd?
I currently have a Juris Doctor, MBA, and LLM (from NYU Law). The Juris Doctor or JD is the first and of course required degree to practice law in the US (unless one has obtained a foreign equivalent, such as LL.B.). The LL.M. degree is for those people who already have a JD, and wants to specialize or teach law. The JSD or SJD is the only "equivalent" of a PHD in law. It is a full doctorate degree in a very deep and focused study of a legal thesis. A foreign lawyer only has to apply for the US Bar Exam in any state and pass to be a lawyer in the US. However, for job purposes, and the realistic probability of passing any state bar, it is extremely urged and strongly recommended that a foreign lawyer get into a known and reputable LLM program, such as from Harvard, NYU, Columbia, and U Penn, and then take the immediately after graduation from the one year LLM program.
Bradley Originally Answered: What do all the different law degrees mean: llm, msl, jd, jsd?
A JD is your basic law degree- Juris Doctor, I don't know what a JSD is, but an LLM is an advanced law degree - higher than a JD. A regular law degree was called a LLB - Bachelor of Laws, and the masters of law was an LLM. In order to practice law you need to have a JD to sit for the state's Bar exam. Now of course there are ABA schools and non ABA schools to add to the fun of the alphabet soup.

If you have your own answer to the question business plan for media agency, then you can write your own version, using the form below for an extended answer.