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English grammar,using the word "Though"?

English grammar,using the word "Though"? Topic: grammar homework
July 20, 2019 / By Jasmine
Question: I'm asking it again to make it sure. =] What's wrong in here ? 1.Although I wanted to watch the movie, I couldn't. 2.Though I wanted to watch the movie ,I had to do my homework. 3.I didn't watched the movie,I wanted to watch the movie, though. 4.I wanted to watch the movie although. (Is this wrong because "although can't be the last word in a sentence ?)
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Best Answers: English grammar,using the word "Though"?

Eustacia Eustacia | 2 days ago
1.Although I wanted to watch the movie, I couldn't. CORRECT 2.Though I wanted to watch the movie ,I had to do my homework. CORRECT 3.I didn't watched the movie,I wanted to watch the movie, though. INCORRECT watched ==> watch any of these sentences would work: I didn't watch the movie, though I wanted to watch it. (comma) I didn't watch the movie; I wanted to watch it, though. (semicolon) I didn't watch the movie. I wanted to watch it, though. (period, new sentence) 4.I wanted to watch the movie although. (Is this wrong because "although can't be the last word in a sentence ?) Yes, it is wrong. "Though" can be used at the end like "however," but "although" cannot.
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We found more questions related to the topic: grammar homework


Eustacia Originally Answered: English grammar. Could you please teach me about a word” something”?
Hello, I have pondered your question. I teach ESL and this particular question has never come up. The word something is a non-specific pronoun. You are quite correct when you say that in English, adjectives are always placed before the noun. However, this is not the case with pronouns. For example, if you have the sentence, "She is pretty," the adjective comes after the pronoun, although you have the verb in between. With personal pronouns, you would never have the pronoun and the adjective right next to each other. You can say "pretty girl" using a noun, of course, but you can't say "pretty she" or "she pretty." The non-specific pronouns work in a different way, and I suppose that the reason the adjective is almost always placed after the non-specific pronouns is actually because of the fact that the word does refer to something that is unknown. Since it is unknown , ie, something, it is linguistically more logical for the description, i.e., the adjective, to come after it. It makes a listener uncomfortable to have a description given and then to be told that what has been described is not actually known. Therefore, to say I have a beautiful, wonderful, very expensive, 15-year-old, blue something.........it is like leading the listener on. If, on the other hand, I were to say that I have something that is beautiful, wonderful, very expensive, 15 years old and blue, the listener would not be irritated and frustrated at the end of the list of adjectives, since he or she would already know that I am not saying exactly what it is. I hope this makes sense! Regards, Lady Morgana
Eustacia Originally Answered: English grammar. Could you please teach me about a word” something”?
こんにちわ! わたしは ニュウジランドじんです. にほんごを べんきょうしていますから, I may be able to help you. In English, adjectives are usually placed in front of nouns, like in あかい えんぴつ, red pencil. However, when describing a general word such as 'something' you place the adjective afterwards. This is because you are basically saying 'something (that is) good'. (It is difficult to explain why this works. It's probably because you don't say what the something is, so how can you describe it?) In English we say: あかい えんぴつ, red pencil おおきい うち, big house We do not say: えんぴつ あかい, pencil red うち おおきい, house big We can say: Something good, the house is big, the pencil is red, anything good, etc. I hope this helps, がんばって!

Eustacia Originally Answered: HEY ENGLISH PEOPLE! I'm writing a letter in English. Would you check it for grammar and help make it better?
RE-write Hello Danny, On the website I am asking the donors to notify us of their donations via email or contact form. I am also asking they provide their contact information so that we may express our appreciation, and whether or not they want to remain anonymous. I believe we should include our company's email address on the site to make sure we get these emails. Regards, Diana
Eustacia Originally Answered: HEY ENGLISH PEOPLE! I'm writing a letter in English. Would you check it for grammar and help make it better?
Hello Danny, On the website, I am asking the donors to notify us of their donations by email or via contact form and provide their contact information so that we may express our appreciation. Please let us know if any of the donors want their names listed on the website or if prefer to stay anonymous. I think we should include our company's email address on the site to make sure we get the emails. Regards, Diana
Eustacia Originally Answered: HEY ENGLISH PEOPLE! I'm writing a letter in English. Would you check it for grammar and help make it better?
you don't need the comma after "website" because it is not an intro longer than 5 words so it is not necessary. Your first sentence is way too long. This is very badly written to a point where I do not know what to tell you, lol.

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