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A 4.98 g sample of aniline (C6H5NH2, molar mass = 93.13 g/mol) was combusted in a bomb calorimeter with a heat?

A 4.98 g sample of aniline (C6H5NH2, molar mass = 93.13 g/mol) was combusted in a bomb calorimeter with a heat? Topic: Problem solving methods in c
May 23, 2019 / By Porter
Question: A 4.98 g sample of aniline (C6H5NH2, molar mass = 93.13 g/mol) was combusted in a bomb calorimeter with a heat capacity of 4.25 kJ/°C. If the temperature rose from 29.5°C to 69.8°C, determine the value of ΔH°comb for aniline. This is for home work... someone please explain how to work this problem out. Thanks
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Best Answers: A 4.98 g sample of aniline (C6H5NH2, molar mass = 93.13 g/mol) was combusted in a bomb calorimeter with a heat?

Originally Answered: Using a calorimeter having a heat capacity of 10.0 kJ/°C, a 2.00 g sample of an organic compound is burned.?
12.0 x specific heat ( 24.0 - 88.0) + 100 g x 4.18 ( 24.0 - 20.0)=0 - 768 x specific heat +1672 =0 specific heat = 2.19 J/g°C
Originally Answered: Using a calorimeter having a heat capacity of 10.0 kJ/°C, a 2.00 g sample of an organic compound is burned.?
"4. 2.18J/g°C" is the correct answer *********** there are three equations you need to know for calorimetry problems like this.. 1) a heat balance. heat lost by one substance = heat gained by another 2) Q = m Cp dT for a change in Temp without a phase change 3) Q = m dHfus (or m dHvap or m dHsub) for a phase change. where... Q = heat gained or lost m = mass or moles depending on units of Cp and dH dT = change in temp dHfus = heat of fusion, dHvap = heat of vaporization, dHsub = heat of sublimation. and of course heats of melting = - heat of fusion heat of condensation = - heat of vaporization heat of deposition = - heat of sublimation. got all that? on to your problem... ************** heat lost by metal = heat gained by water substituting... (m Cp dT) metal = (m Cp dT) water rearranging... Cp metal = (m Cp dT) water / (m dT) metal solving.. Cp metal = (100.0g x 4.184J/g°C x (24.0°C - 20.0°C)) / (12.0g x (88.0°C - 24.0°C)) Cp metal = 2.18 J/g°C **************** questions? and yes, you have to look up the heat capacity of water.

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