4059 Shares

Write the standard form of the equation of the line?

Write the standard form of the equation of the line? Topic: How to write a graph equation in standard form
July 18, 2019 / By Sal
Question: Write the standard form of the equation of the line that passes through B(-2, 3) and is perpendicular to the graph of 2y + 6 = 0 I don't get this question, any help would be great! Thanks! I'm not being lazy, I really don't get it. I do understand, however that the slope is zero, but then wouldn't that make the equation y=3? It says that it wants it in standard form and y=3 obviously isn't in standard form.
Best Answer

Best Answers: Write the standard form of the equation of the line?

Nichola Nichola | 8 days ago
A bunch of things are going on here. First off, try to visualize (or graph) the line 2y+6 = 0; this line contains all the points for which the y coordinate (height) is -3 (if 2y+6=0 then 2y = -6 and so on). Now, what kind of a line would be perpendicular to this one? Draw any perpendicular line and find two points on it; what do they have in common. Once you see that you can tell what the line through point (-2,3) must be. As far as standard form -- we have three different forms for equations of lines. Each "form" is just a rule for how to write the parts of a line. The usual way in most textbooks to show the form is Ax + By = C. (The B here is just a number, and has nothing to do with the point B). So, for the line you were given, 2y+6 = 0 the standard form would be 0x+2y=-6 -- or just 2y=-6. Many teachers would want you to eliminate the common factors among A, B and C, for for this line you'd write y = -3. This problem is made particularly easy (once you see it) because the line you started with doesn't depend on x. In most cases the equations will involve both x and y.
👍 204 | 👎 8
Did you like the answer? Write the standard form of the equation of the line? Share with your friends

We found more questions related to the topic: How to write a graph equation in standard form


Nichola Originally Answered: Write an equation in standard form of the line that passes through (1,1) and (9,7)?
Okay! first of all, you have to find the slope of these points... Slope formula is Y2-Y1/X2-X1 Figure out which points you want to use... as Y1 Y2 X1 and X2 (1,1) (9,7) 7-1 ------ = 6/8 9-1 The formula for a liner line is y= mx+b from this point you choose between the two points given... I choose (1,1) because it's easier to calculate... m= slope y=mx+b 1=6/8 (1) +b >>> subtract 6/8 on both sides to solve for b 1/1-6/8 = 2/8=1/4 b= 1/4 plug into the equation: y= 6/8x + 1/4
Nichola Originally Answered: Write an equation in standard form of the line that passes through (1,1) and (9,7)?
First find the slope of the line. It is defined by the change in y as a function of x. so 7-1 / (9/1) = 6/8 = 3/4. Using y = mx +b. find the intercept where it works 1 = (3/4)*1 + b sovle for b and we get 1/4 = b so y(x) = (3/4)x +1/4. To check apply x = 9 and see if you get 7 9*3= 27/4 + 1/4 = 28/4 = 7.

Lyndi Lyndi
There are two ways to write the equation of a line: y = mx+b (y-y1) = m(x-x1) The second is the best to use when you have a slope (m) and a point (x1,y1) So plugging in your values, we get (y--4) = -2/3 (x-2) y+4 = -2/3 x +4/3 y = -2/3 x +(4/3 - 12/3) y = -2/3 x - 8/3
👍 80 | 👎 7

Kaylin Kaylin
2y + 6 = 0 y = -3 This is a horizontal line. A perpendicular to it is vertical. Since it passes through (-2, 3), the equation of the perpendicular is x = -2. http://www.flickr.com/photos/dwread/4286...
👍 73 | 👎 6

Kaylin Originally Answered: Write an equation in the variable x having 6 as the only solution. Type the equation in standard form,?
If x = 6 is the only solution, think about this: If x = h is a solution and x = k is a solution, then (x-h)(x-k) gives you the equation in standard form once you complete the expansion. In your case, the only solution is x=6 so both h and k = 6. Substitute and do the multiplication.

If you have your own answer to the question how to write a graph equation in standard form, then you can write your own version, using the form below for an extended answer.