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If software bugs are inevitable, or at least to be expected depending on the complexity of the code, what step

If software bugs are inevitable, or at least to be expected depending on the complexity of the code, what step Topic: Beta research
June 26, 2019 / By Nevin
Question: If software bugs are inevitable, or at least to be expected depending on the complexity of the code, what steps can people relying on computer programs take to deal with the bugs
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Best Answers: If software bugs are inevitable, or at least to be expected depending on the complexity of the code, what step

Kipp Kipp | 8 days ago
NEVER use a Beta version or the first release of any software, especially an operating system. Before you buy, research known compatiibility issues on computer sites.
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Kipp Originally Answered: Do computer scientist or software engineers still write some code in binary?
most programmers don't need to use binary at all, at least not directly. it is common to apply a bitmask to a value, but this almost always done using hex values rather than binary, since its a much more compact way to specify the same thing. for instance, maybe you want to do something if bit 2 in a byte was 1.. you could do: if (myval and 00000100) { do something } but any programmer would do this instead: if (myval and 4) { do something} it's just shorter. so on one hand programmers use binary math all the time, but they rarely if ever actually deal with the 1 and 0s in binary form. as far as specifying actual machine instructions in binary form, like setting a bunch of toggle switches on a console or something, no, nobody does that anymore and unless they are really old a programmer today probably never has and doesn't know how to.
Kipp Originally Answered: Do computer scientist or software engineers still write some code in binary?
Doubt it, computer engineers do actually need to know the values of specific bits when doing things like microncontroller programming though and can change them if needed I believe in C program(which incorporates assembly too) Another thing that comes to mind is implementing a CPU instruction set in firmware.
Kipp Originally Answered: Do computer scientist or software engineers still write some code in binary?
No. Or at least, very nearly so. There are a few instances (especially in breaking security) when you do look through the raw executable data, but that is extremely rare. Even then, it's mostly not writing any new code in the raw format, but just copy+pasting the code that the computer generated.

Huntley Huntley
Get a degree in computer programming and edit the source code yourself... But seriously -- there's not a lot that you can do, except avoiding buying new versions of software -- wait a few months, until the software company has worked all the kinks out.
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Huntley Originally Answered: I'm learning to write software and program computers. Does smoking weed help you write better code?
Nope. Smoking weed negatively affects your short term memory. When programming, this is one of the things that you need to be in top shape. There are hundreds of things to remember when writing a program, from dynamic variables, to class architecture and function names. Having an impared memory will actually make you take twice as long to write a program.
Huntley Originally Answered: I'm learning to write software and program computers. Does smoking weed help you write better code?
It totally helps, especially in the planning and design phase. Once the weed starts to wear off after a few hours though, you start getting sluggish and it's hard to be productive.

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