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A Question About Parakeets???????

A Question About Parakeets??????? Topic: homework chat room
May 23, 2019 / By Noelene
Question: Ok so I have a male parakeet that I got about 9 months ago... but he seems lonely a lot since I'm at school or not spending time with him because of homework... I still let him out but I'm usually doing my homework or chores at the same time so he just sits there... (But I still play with him when I can) I was hoping of getting another parakeet sometime and I thought that maybe I would get one and let them play outside their cages together... and I've heard that you should have them in separate cages the first couple days or so... but could I keep them in separate cages all together and maybe have them in different rooms... and then let them be together only outside the cage???? Because people have been saying that if you put them in the same cage they might not care that much for you anymore and they will only care about each other... and I still want them to bond with me too?????? What should I do????? Any tips???? Please, anything will help!!!!
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Lyrica Lyrica | 2 days ago
If you can't spend more time with your bird and want another parakeet, that is fine. I suggest separate cages because it's likely the birds may not get along with each other. I keep all my parakeets in separate cages so they don't fight with or injure each other. I keep the parakeets in the same room so they can chat with each other and have each other's company. Letting them play outside of their cages is good, as long as they get along with each other. Supervise them carefully when the parakeets are out of the cage.
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Lyrica Originally Answered: Question about parakeets?
1. The question isn't really "when can I take it out", but "when can I start taming it". What I would recommend is that you give it 1 or 2 more days, and for those next few days, talk to it and spend as much time with it as you can. after that, you can start finger training it and teaching it the step up command, by first letting it get used to having your hand in the cage, and then gradually closer and closer to itself, until you can press against its belly and have it perch on your finger. 2.Maybe, maybe not. Every bird is different, but since you got it young, most likely not. If it does bite you, don't scream, yell or react in any way. If you do, the bird will know this will make you go away, and will bite other times. As for the behavior, it's hard to tell preening from biting, but even it was bonded with another bird, it won't make a difference in it's training or bonding with you. 3.Parakeets/ Budgies are born with all their colors and their feathers don't change as they get older except for with certain colors that will lose their forehead stripes after about 5 to 12 months of age. It will most likely grow a bit more over the next few months, but it's feathers won't change color or pattern. Also, here's a very useful link for determining the color type/mutation, gender, and age of your bird. http://www.budgieplace.com/ 4. Your budgie is probably still nervous about moving to it's new home, and as it gets used to it and becomes more relaxed, it will begin to eat more, play with toys, and explore it's cage.
Lyrica Originally Answered: Question about parakeets?
In my enjoy, parakeets do higher in even numbers with an same male to feminine ratio in order that they are able to variety pairs. If you recognize your parakeets gender, check out simplest getting some of the reverse gender. Aim for identical dimension and age if in any respect feasible. And sure, for those who did not improve the cage, the usual parakeet would possibly suppose that his house is being intruded upon. Get a brand new, higher cage, and introduce the brand new and usual parakeet to it whilst. There could also be a few bickering in the beginning, however except there's honestly harm being performed, allow them to identify themselves earlier than you do some thing. However, if someone is being real competitive and harming the opposite, separate them instantly.

Keila Keila
I took in a rescue parakeet, while I had my own female. The rescue bird was a male. Since mine was already bonded to me, I didn't have a problem. I did have separate cages, and allowed them to go from one cage to another, when ever they wanted. I had the cages side by side, and they would play back and forth all day, but when I sat down, here they both would come, to sit on me. They did like to sleep in the same cage though. The rescue bird was in a cage way too small for him, half starved, he was out sitting on my husband's lap within a hour of bringing him home. I have always heard that two females will fight, and that possibly might be true, I know my female was the dominant one.
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India India
They make recordings for that. You can play some parakeet phrases for him to listen to while you are away and he can actually learn to talk. You might also consider a fake buddie, one of those plastic parakeets, that sits on a perch. He'll take to it like a friend and try to get a response from it. Parakeets also love to chat with their own image in a toy mirror affixed to the side of the cage. If you do go with the option of another bird, he'll want to mate with a female and he may bicker with another male. I'd leave them inside their cages until you've seen how the react toward each other. Have you tried to finger train your pet so that he'll sit on your finger or on your shoulder. That he can do while you are busy with homework, too.
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India Originally Answered: I've done everything i can to get my parakeets to like me' and its not working. any help?
You are doing a lot of things right and taking good care of your new feathered friends. I know it can be disappointing and frustrating when they don't seem to be responding the way you'd like. I am no expert, but have owned several keets in my life and have done lots of reading and research. Here are a couple of thoughts: -Three weeks is not that long a time for your new budgies to become fully comfortable in their new home. It can take a lot longer than that for them to trust you, and/or feel comfortable enough to play with you. I think part of the solution is to do exactly what you've been doing - being a good human. But be patient. They do need more time. -Having two friends together will make it much harder to tame them. They have each other - they don't need you. This is a tough call. Sometimes people feel bad that their keet seems lonely and buy a friend. Though some would say that is the "politically correct" thing to do, you lose out on the one-on-one bonding that will happen with a single bird. You could try this - buy a second cage, fix it up nice, and separate the birds, including putting them in separate rooms. Then start over. Give them a few days to get used to being on their own. Then start leaving your hand in the cage for a period of time every day, until they each stop freaking out at the sight of you. Then follow the usual methods of finger-taming you'll find in many good books or internet articles. Are their wings clipped? If not, clip them, or you will spend a lot of time chasing your full-flighted birds as they look for each other! After they are both well-tamed and calmed down (this could take weeks or months) you could try putting the cages in the same room once in while, or letting them have playtime outside their cages in a gym or other fun area. You might not be able to let them live together again though. They may go right back to ignoring you. Anyway, good luck! Have patience, and know that you're already being a better human than a lot of folks who don't provide what you already do for your birds!

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