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What percent of a nation's population can be utilized for military puproses?

What percent of a nation's population can be utilized for military puproses? Topic: How to write a little bit in spanish
July 18, 2019 / By Tania
Question: I'm writing a fantasy novel and I want to make sure I use realistic numbers. Also, how much of one's army would one use for a battle or campaign or anything else you think might be useful to me? The novel is based a little bit off of the Renaissance Era, particularly the Dutch Revolt and the Spanish Conquest of the New World.
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Rickena Rickena | 10 days ago
Back then quite a lot of the population could theoretically be mobilized for war. Women tend to take over the jobs while the men go die in order to keep production up. As late as during WW2 the male casualties where so high that it became something of a problem in the most heavily affected countries (Japan, Germany, Russia) because such a high amount of the male population where killed and even more had been broken by the war both mentally and physically. However, it's rare for countries, even back in the renaissance and earlier, to use conscription in order to increase the size of the military ranks unless absolutely necesarry, as profesional soldiers are better in every way. a company of trained soldiers can easily take on an entire battalion of conscripts. Also, it's extremely unpopular as people being forced to leave their homes to fight generally have low morale in addition to lack of skill. (There's a reason the romans even 2000 years ago used profesionall soldiers almost exclusively) For taking colonies and beating down revolts smaller forces with atleast semi-profesional soldiers would most likely be used. Revolts are usually done by civilians and there is allways some distance between the profesionall soldier and the civilian population. Whereas a conscript would consider himself part of the civilians and would very likely leave his post and join the revolt. However for fighting off an invading force, as much as 30, maybe 40% of the male population could theoretically be mobilized given enough time to mobilize. (This could not be continued forever though, we're talking relatively short term).
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Rickena Originally Answered: What percent of the world population lives in Africa?
http://www.nationmaster.com/index.php Always the first place I go for all my international statistics needs.
Rickena Originally Answered: What percent of the world population lives in Africa?
Did you try Wikipedia first? I know it's not reliable enough for academic purposes, but you can use their sources to verify the information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_con... In addition to the source provided by Elegua!, you could also try the UN for statistics: http://unstats.un.org/unsd/pubs/gesgrid....

Minty Minty
Figures for late medieval/early modern armies are notoriously unreliable. I'd say no more than 10% of the population can be in the army at any one time, and you're not going to get close to that figure in reality due to disease and desertion.
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Lillia Lillia
That answer can be looked up in Janes or in several various search engines. Generally that is a state secret, but it can be deduced. Every nation has an acceptable casualty rate in which it can still maintain its economy. No economy, no military.
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Lillia Originally Answered: A manufacturer advertises a new synthesis reaction for methane with a percent yield of 110 percent. Comm?
I think its telling you to comment if the claim is valid or not. I would say no its not because there is a 110 percent yeild which is not possible if im correct.

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