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My parents won't let me apply to my dream schools?

My parents won't let me apply to my dream schools? Topic: Dream jobs applications
June 26, 2019 / By Hiel
Question: I'm a senior in high school and during this time I'm working on my college applications. My dream schools are American University and George Washington University. My parents won't let me apply to them, though, since they're expensive. I understand, but why won't they understand where I'M coming from? My academic interests lie in politics and the social sciences. And those schools have fantastic social sciences programs. They are the top two politically active schools in the nation. This is all what make them my dream schools! I have a clear vision of what I'd like to do in the future regarding my career and everything. I've done very well in high school and I'm almost positive that I would get in if I were to apply. But my parents wouldn't let me go even if I do get accepted. What the hell? They're crushing my dreams. They tell me to go to a state school... Do they value money more than my happiness? I'm a highly ambitious person, determined to do well in college and to start working asap through internships. But they mention other kids (kids of their friends) who went to prestigious schools and are doing nothing with their degrees. WELL I'M NOT THEM. Even if I end up not getting a job right after undergrad or grad school, so what? At least I'd have the valuable education from a school that I had a great time in. I'd feel proud of my degree. I wouldn't feel happy at a state school. I feel that by going there I would become depressed again (I was depressed junior year). Okay, so, obviously the two schools are expensive. They're in D.C. But it's such a special city, one I absolutely love. Its intellectual, professional, and politically active environment is ideal for me. I would thrive academically and my potential could be hatched. Okay, same thing with Bryn Mawr. Just because it's a private LAC, my parents won't let me apply. A LOT OF SCHOOLS ARE PRIVATE. My brother went to Columbia for grad school and is now attending Georgetown for law school. My parents say it's different for him because grad school was only for two years and law school he's paying for himself. Is it stubborn and childish of me to be disappointed? I feel so upset. I feel that I did all this work in high school for nothing. Well, not nothing, but I feel like state schools are way below my level. Can you make me feel better and help me to just accept all of this? also, i live in a middle to high class town and attend a pretty good high school. i'm sure the taxes are very high... if those are manageable, why not my college tuition?? i'm really upset because all my friends are applying to ivy league schools and some of them aren't even financially stable... yet, in my house we have financial stability and my parents won't let me apply to my dream schools. george washington is the second most expensive school in the country but american and bryn mawr aren't as up there...
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Best Answers: My parents won't let me apply to my dream schools?

Elpalet Elpalet | 1 day ago
As a native Washingtonian, I appreciate your love for our city and its primary area of focus. So please understand that it is with love that I tell you that your parents have a far better point than you appreciate. George Washington and American are perfectly solid schools, but their academic reputation does not justify their price tag. (State schools like UVA, Michigan, and Berkeley, on the other hand, outrank many of their private counterparts.) And you will arguably be a much more attractive prospect for political jobs if you've managed to build an engaged constituency at a school where the student body doesn't eat, breathe, and sleep politics - plus, you'll have a lot more flexibility in terms of being able to take the typically low-paying entry level positions that the field has to offer if you're not staring down loans that you can't possibly pay back on $30k or less a year - which you will be, if your parents literally can't afford to finance your education themselves. ETA: Hon, the high property taxes are probably why your parents can't afford to pay for college. If you weren't getting the academic grounding at your high-achieving public school, all your ambition would really be for naught. So if you want your complaints to be taken seriously, quit whining about the fact your already privileged lifestyle does in fact have an upper limit, and either come up with a plan for how you're going to finance school on your own (again, taking into account how you're going to pay it all back when you're done) or take that ambition and intelligence and make the best of the hand you're dealt.
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Elpalet Originally Answered: How many UC schools can you apply for in California?
You can apply to all the UC schools if you like, you just have to pay $60 for each campus you apply. If you are applying this year, be sure to not stress out and get personal statement done early.

Clancy Clancy
They are crushing your dreams? Hardly. Step back. Take a breath. Chill. College isn't as dramatic as you intend it to be. For one, state schools are NOT below your level. Going into major debt for that dream school as your undergrad? Not a good idea. It's really short-sighted of you to really miss the point here. Unless you can get scholarships to cover AT LEAST 75% of your tuition at these schools, forget for it for right now. As someone who is still paying off her husband's out-of-school tuition, it's not fun and not worth it. Does that mean you can't ever do it? NO! Go to a state school for a few years, get your general ed classes out the way, and see about transferring. Or, if that doesn't pan out, apply to these dream schools for law school/grad work. Basically, you aren't doomed if you don't go to these schools. Play it smart and make wise decisions based on logic, not emotion - which is what you are doing now.
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Amlodi Amlodi
Suggest a compromise. You will apply to and go to one of your state universities as they want. As a side trip, you will also apply to Georgetown and American. Whenever and wherever you are accepted, show your parents the costs at each, together with whatever financial assistance packages are offered. But agree to go to the state school if they insist. In two years at the state school, you will satisfy all general requirements: Freshman English composition, foreign language, humanities and science electives, intro courses in your major. Then lobby your parents to transfer to American or Georgetown for advanced courses in your major.
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Timotha Timotha
If you want to go to College, go. Get loans and grants to pay for your tuition. This is YOUR life, not theirs. I went to College and the only thing it got me was 30 grand in debt. I graduated top of my class, now I clean dishes at McDonalds to pay off the debt that I acquired through College. Just beware, the economy is sh*t right now and will likely be that way for quite a while.
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Timotha Originally Answered: How do I decide what law schools to apply to in india?
Selecting a law school is an important decision that should be made with care and research.so i would like to suggest u a best law college in india The Jindal Global Law School (JGLS) Its provide world-class legal education with both national and global perspectives. JGLS will educate students about law in the context of globalization and impart skills required to be a successful lawyer. JGLS will strive to inculcate in students a sense of professionalism, responsibility towards society, respect for the rule of law and fundamental.hurry up Last Date for LSAT Test Registration: 27 April 2009 Date of LSAT—India Examination: 24 May 2009 get more information

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